Summary of the Systematic Review

Article Citation

Screening of Cognitive Changes in Adults With Intellectual Disabilities: A Systematic Review

Paiva, A. F., Nolan, A., et al. (2020).
Brain Sciences, 10(11), 848.
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Sponsoring Body

No funding received

Article Quality Ratings

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Indicators of Review Quality

  • Yes The review states a clearly focused question/aim.
  • Yes Criteria for inclusion of studies are provided.
  • Yes Search strategy described in sufficient detail for replication.
  • Yes Included studies are assessed for study quality.
  • No Quality assessments are reproducible.
  • Yes Characteristics of the included studies are provided.

Quality Rating Notes

Study Quality: Only aggregate ratings were provided.

Article Details

Description

This is a systematic review of cross-sectional and longitudinal design studies investigating screening tools to detect cognitive changes in adults with intellectual disabilities. Although speech-language pathologists do not diagnose dementia, findings from this review may be useful for identifying screening tools to detect cognitive and behavioral changes in adults with intellectual disabilities.

Questions/Aims Addressed

This review aimed to synthesize available studies examining screening tools used to identify cognitive and behavioral changes in adults with intellectual disabilities.

Population

Adults with intellectual disabilities

Intervention/Assessment

Screening tools to detect cognitive and behavioral changes

Number of Studies Included

75

Years Included

Up to October 2020


Conclusions from This Systematic Review

What are Conclusions?

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Screening

Evidence was reported to support the use of specifically-designed instruments, such as the Dementia Questionnaire for Learning Disabilities (DLD) and the Cambridge Cognitive Examination—Down Syndrome (CAMCOG-DS), to identify cognitive and behavior changes related to Intellectual Disabilities and dementia. The use of measures for the general population was discouraged due to the lack of sensitivity in differentiating individuals with and without dementia. Evidence indicated the DLD as a promising informant-based screening tool since it addressed cognitive and behavioral symptoms.

Keywords: Age, Adults, Co-Occuring Conditions, Cognition, Cognitive-Communication, Dementia

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Screening

Evidence was reported to support the use of specifically-designed instruments, such as the Dementia Questionnaire for Learning Disabilities (DLD) and the Cambridge Cognitive Examination—Down Syndrome (CAMCOG-DS), to identify cognitive and behavior changes related to Intellectual Disabilities and dementia. The use of measures for the general population was discouraged due to the lack of sensitivity in differentiating individuals with and without dementia. Evidence indicated the DLD as a promising informant-based screening tool since it addressed cognitive and behavioral symptoms.

Keywords: Age, Adults, Co-Occuring Conditions, Cognition, Cognitive-Communication, Dementia

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