Summary of the Systematic Review

Article Citation

Social Skills Interventions for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Bellinger, J. M., Perlman, E. H., et al. (2011).
School Psychology Forum, 5(4), 141-159.
Go to Article

Sponsoring Body

Not stated

Article Quality Ratings

Read about Our Rating Process

Indicators of Review Quality

  • Yes The review states a clearly focused question/aim.
  • Yes Criteria for inclusion of studies are provided.
  • Yes Search strategy described in sufficient detail for replication.
  • No Included studies are assessed for study quality.
  • N/A Quality assessments are reproducible.
  • Yes Characteristics of the included studies are provided.

Article Details

Description

This is a review of peer-reviewed studies that investigated the effectiveness of social skills interventions for individuals with autism spectrum disorder.

Questions/Aims Addressed

"The current review included single-case and group design studies that examined the effectiveness of a social skills intervention for students with ASD [autism spectrum disorder]" (p. 143).

Population

Individuals with autism spectrum disorder

Intervention/Assessment

Social skills interventions

Number of Studies Included

32

Years Included

2005-2010


Conclusions from This Systematic Review

What are Conclusions?

Go to Map

Treatment

All treatments (i.e., scripts, video modeling, Social Stories, and peer-mediated interventions) led to gains in social engagement, with scripts appearing to be the most effective.

Keywords: Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC), Computer/Technology/Video-Based Instruction, Social Communication, Visual Supports/Activity Schedules, Peer-Mediated Interventions, Social Scripts, Story-Based Interventions

Role-play and video modeling had moderate to large treatment effects on social competence.

Keywords: Computer/Technology/Video-Based Instruction, Social Communication, Rehearsal/Role Play

Video modeling, Social Stories, and visual organizers produced the most beneficial gains in social communication skills, however only a small number of studies examined these methods making it "difficult to interpret the meaningfulness and generalizability of the outcomes. In addition, although prompting produced a slightly smaller effect compared to the aforementioned approaches, this technique did lead to moderate gains across the various communication outcomes. Therefore, prompting may also be a promising technique for teaching social communication skills" (p. 144). 

Keywords: Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC), Computer/Technology/Video-Based Instruction, Social Communication, Visual Supports/Activity Schedules, Prompting, Story-Based Interventions

Our Partners